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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Framing effects and expected social security claiming behavior found in the catalog.

Framing effects and expected social security claiming behavior

Brown, Jeffrey R.

Framing effects and expected social security claiming behavior

by Brown, Jeffrey R.

  • 215 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementJeffrey R. Brown, Arie Kapteyn, Olivia S. Mitchell
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 17018, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) -- working paper no. 17018.
ContributionsKapteyn, Arie, Mitchell, Olivia S., National Bureau of Economic Research
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB1
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24924189M
LC Control Number2011657228

behavior and well-being is also a valuable exercise. This paper uses the Gustman and Steinmeier structural model to analyze the effects of four changes to the Social Security program on recipients’ retirement timing and household consumption. For Each Problem: Problem-by-Problem Analysis. The dependent variable was the proportion of younger and older adults selecting Option B in each problem (see Table 1).We used a chi-square test to assess whether the choice proportions were significantly different across the two frames (especially, whether the choice proportion is significantly higher in the negative frame than in the positive Cited by:

Journal Article File Downloads Abstract Views; Last month: 3 months: 12 months: Total: Last month: 3 months: 12 months: Total: (k) matching contributions . authors suggested that “claiming behavior should be better understood by those interested in Social Secu-rity” (). Related to the interaction between leaving the workforce and claiming Social Security benefits is the relationship between a retiree’s claiming age and the resulting benefit amount. This relationship should also.

The theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, ) and social cognitive theory (Bandura, ) specify processes that lead to behavior change, such as perceived efficacy and intentions. The current study found both an individual difference factor (approach/avoidance motivation) and a situational factor (message framing) that interact within the Cited by: “Social Security: Maximize Your Benefits” offers practical information that allows you to select the optimal claiming strategy that applies to your personal financial circumstances. Based on your age and marital status (single, married, divorced or survivor) follow step-by-step instructions to maximizing your Social Security benefits/5(14).


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Framing effects and expected social security claiming behavior by Brown, Jeffrey R. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior. Jeffrey R. Brown, Arie Kapteyn, and Olivia S. Mitchell. Ap Abstract. Eligible participants in the U.S. Social Security system claim benefits anytime may from agewith benefit levels actuarially adjusted based on. Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior Jeffrey R.

Brown, Arie Kapteyn, Olivia S. Mitchell. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in May NBER Program(s):Economics of Aging, Public Economics Eligible participants in the U.S. Social Security system may claim benefits anytime from agewith benefit levels actuarially adjusted based on the claiming age.

Get this from a library. Framing effects and expected Social Security claiming behavior. [Jeffrey R Brown; Arie Kapteyn; Olivia S Mitchell; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Eligible participants in the U.S. Social Security system may claim benefits anytime from agewith benefit levels actuarially adjusted based on the claiming age.

Eligible participants in the U.S. Social Security system may claim benefits anytime from agewith benefit levels actuarially adjusted based on the claiming age. This paper shows that individual intentions with regard to Social Security claiming ages are sensitive to how the early versus late claiming decision is Cited by: Survey respondents received the same financial information in the following framing scenarios: the age of Social Security claiming as a break-even (anchored age 62) analysis, in which people who lived long enough would recoup foregone benefits before the age of claiming; eight different combinations of Social Security collection as the loss or.

Downloadable. Eligible participants in the U.S. Social Security system may claim benefits anytime from agewith benefit levels actuarially adjusted based on the claiming age. This paper shows that individual intentions with regard to Social Security claiming ages are sensitive to how the early versus late claiming decision is by: Downloadable.

Eligible participants in the U.S. Social Security system may claim benefits anytime from agewith benefit levels actuarially adjusted based on the claiming age. This paper shows that individual intentions with regard to Social Security claiming ages are sensitive to how the early versus late claiming decision is framed.

Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior. Book. Jan ; This paper shows that individual intentions with regard to Social Security claiming ages are sensitive to how. a cut in the Social Security benefit: claiming the benefit at any given age results in a lower benefit than if the FRA had not changed.

This reduces the expected present discounted value of lifetime benefits (Social Security Wealth), and should cause an increase in the age of retirement if leisure is a normal good. This is the social image hypothesis.

6 A third class of theories of social framing effects is that the frame affects the expectations that people have about each her’s behavior, and these expectations in turn affect the own by: T1 - Framing and claiming.

T2 - How information-framing affects expected social security claiming behavior. AU - Brown, Jeffrey R. AU - Kapteyn, Arie. AU - Mitchell, Olivia S. PY - /3/1. Y1 - /3/1Cited by:   Read Framing effects and expected social security claiming behavior, which is research Brown conducted with Arie Kapteyn, a senior economist.

A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.

This question motivates a new working paper by researchers Jeffrey Brown, Arie Kapteyn, and Olivia S. Mitchell, Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior (NBER Working Paper ).

The researchers use an experimental design to explore whether the manner in which Social Security claiming information is framed influences. Framing is the process by which a communication source constructs and defines a social or political issue for its audience.

While many observers of political communication and the mass media have discussed framing, few have explicitly described how framing affects public opinion. In this paper we offer a theory of framing effects, with a specific focus on the psychological mechanisms by which Cited by: This paper studies the pure framing effect of price discounts, focusing on its impact on consumer search behavior.

In a simple two-shop search experiment, we compare search behavior in base treatments (where both shops post net prices without discounts) to discount treatments (where either the first shop or the second shop posts gross prices with separate discount offers, keeping the net Cited by: [21]  Jeffrey R.

Brown, Arie Kapteyn, and Olivia S. Mitchell, “Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior,” NBER Working Paper No. [22] Dora L Costa and Matthew E.

Kahn, “Energy Conservation “Nudges” and Environmentalist Ideology: Evidence from a Randomized Residential Electricity Field Experiment. Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc View citations (10) Also in Working Papers, RAND Corporation () View citations (7) Framing and Claiming: How Information-Framing Affects Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior.

This article provides evidence that Social Security benefit claiming decisions are strongly affected by framing and are thus inconsistent with expected utility theory.

Using a randomized experiment that controls for both observable and unobservable differences across individuals, we find that the use of a “breakeven analysis” encourages. Three effects of apparently superficial changes in presentation (“framing effects” in a broad sense), were replicated together in the same repeated linear public goods experiment with real financial incentives.

First, 32 repetitions were presented as four phases of 8 repetitions with a break and results summary in between. Contribution levels decayed during each phase but then persistently Cited by:.

Editor’s notes: To contact Jeffrey R. Brown, call ; email [email protected] The paper “Framing and claiming: How information-framing affects expected Social Security claiming behavior” is available online.

So far, the effects of generic frames have been discussed in terms of shares in social media, though specific platforms may be associated with unique uses and effects.

This is because platforms may differ on their affordances, which refer to the properties of platforms that emerge from users' interactions with by: Brown, J., Weisbenner, S.

Forthcoming. The Distributional Effects of the Social Security Windfall Elimination Provision. Journal of Pension Economics and Finance; Brown, J., Kapteyn, A., Mitchell, O. Forthcoming. Framing and Claiming: How Information-Framing Affects Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior.

Journal of Risk and InsuranceEducation: Miami University (BA), Harvard .